University of Illinois at Chicago Century of Progress World's Fair, 1933-1934 (University of Illinois at Chicago)
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[A diorama depicting the John Kinzie's home near Fort Dearborn, Chicago. Kinzie bought his home from
1. [A diorama depicting the John Kinzie's home near Fort Dearborn, Chicago. Kinzie bought his home from Jean Baptise Point DuSable, the first non-native settler in Chicago, in the 1780s and began a trading business with nearby Potawatomi Indians. Kinzie's wife, Eleanor, grew up among the Seneca as a captive.]
[A sign announcing the 1913 silent motion picture drama, "The Battle of Bull Run," a film about the famous
2. [A sign announcing the 1913 silent motion picture drama, "The Battle of Bull Run," a film about the famous U.S. Civil War battle fought in 1861. The Battle of Bull Run was the first major battle of the Civil War. The two armies would face off again a year later in the Second Battle of Bull Run. The Union Army was defeated in both battles.]
[An 1898 model automobile built by the Duryea Motor Wagon Company. Duryea began manufacturing automobiles
3. [An 1898 model automobile built by the Duryea Motor Wagon Company. Duryea began manufacturing automobiles in 1895 and was the first American company to build gasoline-powered vehicle in the United States.]
[General Electric exhibit displaying different types of lamps used throughout human history. Exhibit
4. [General Electric exhibit displaying different types of lamps used throughout human history. Exhibit includes a stone lamp from ancient Babylonia; a crude saucer lamp from southern Europe; a bronze lamp from Rome; a Betty lamp used in colonial New England; a whale oil lamp likely used by an early Chicago family; Edison's first practical lamp; the "smallest lamp in the world," used for medical examination inside the human body; and the "largest lamp in the world," used for lighting airports, athletic fields, and in the motion picture industry.]

[One of the first steam locomotives to run on rails, built by inventor Colonel John Stevens, on display
5. [One of the first steam locomotives to run on rails, built by inventor Colonel John Stevens, on display at A Century of Progress International Exposition, 1933-1934. The prototype locomotive on display here contained a boiler steam propulsion system attached to a wagon.]
[Possible portrait of early American statesmen and inventor Ben Franklin conducting his famous lightening
6. [Possible portrait of early American statesmen and inventor Ben Franklin conducting his famous lightening experiment with his son. In 1752, Franklin flew a kite with a metal key attached during a thunderstorm to prove that lightening was made of electricity. Although European scientists were already conducting similar experiments with electricity, Franklin is credited as the first one to propose using a metal rod or some other conductor to draw off electricity from lightening. Franklin's scientific achievements won him the admiration of Enlightenment intellectuals in Europe and North America and secured his reputation as a leading scientist.]
[The Robert Koch Hall at the Century of Progress. Robert Koch was a German physician and the first scientist
7. [The Robert Koch Hall at the Century of Progress. Robert Koch was a German physician and the first scientist to discover the bacteria that caused tuberculosis in 1882, an achievement that won him the Nobel Prize. The photo is undated.]
[The Robert Koch Hall at the Century of Progress. Robert Koch was a German physician and the first scientist
8. [The Robert Koch Hall at the Century of Progress. Robert Koch was a German physician and the first scientist to discover the bacteria that caused tuberculosis in 1882, an achievement that won him the Nobel Prize. The photo is undated.]

[U.S. Army marching band assembled in front of the Pantheon building at A Century of Progress. The building
9. [U.S. Army marching band assembled in front of the Pantheon building at A Century of Progress. The building housed the famed "Pantheon de la Guerre," a giant panorama of World War I painted on a canvas 45 feet high and over the length of one football field. Over 130 French artists worked on the Pantheon in Paris during the First World War. The painting depicted a procession of political and military leaders from over 20 Allied nations.]
"'Be a swell person -- Take an Orphan to the Fair' is the motto of the movement started by the Mandel
10. "'Be a swell person -- Take an Orphan to the Fair' is the motto of the movement started by the Mandel Brothers, State street department store, to help charitable Chicagoans take under-privileged children on World's Fair outings. Shown here is Leon Mandel, general manager, with the first of the groups to visit the exposition, composed of boys from the Bohemian Orphan asylum, the Illinois Protestant Children's home, and the Chicago Home for Jewish children. A special department, under the management of Mrs. Jennie Pervin, has been organized in the club women's bureau on the ninth floor of the store, to assist persons planning orphan parties; such persons may write, call in person, or telephone State 1500. Orphans, in groups of three or more, will be admitted to the Fair grounds for five cents each."
"'Boy Howdy! This is our idea of a sandwich,' exclaims Audrey Hoesch and Glen Hillgartner as they bite
11. "'Boy Howdy! This is our idea of a sandwich,' exclaims Audrey Hoesch and Glen Hillgartner as they bite into the first portion of the world's largest ham sandwich today at the World's Fair, while Phillip R. Reed, treasurer of Armour & Company; Ed Graule, chef, and John R. Thompson, Jr., look on. This eight foot square sandwich on which more than 1,200 children feasted, weighed 325 pounds."
"'Have a World's Fair cane, boys," says Leon Mandel, general manager of Mandel Brothers, state street
12. "'Have a World's Fair cane, boys," says Leon Mandel, general manager of Mandel Brothers, state street store, to these orphans from the Bohemian Orphan asylum, the Illinois Protestant Children's home and the Chicago Home for Jewish Children. He was host Wednesday (September 26th) to the first group to visit the exposition under the store's plan to assist charitable Chicagoans in taking underprivileged children on World's Fair outings. A special department, in charge of Mrs. Jennie Pervin, has been set up in the club women's bureau on the ninth floor, to help hosts organize their groups. For full information, citizens need only write, call in person, or telephone State 1500. Orphans will be admitted to the Fair in groups of three or more for five cents each."

"'Murderers Row' of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, which today defeated the Detroit Symphony Orchestra,
13. "'Murderers Row' of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, which today defeated the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, 18 to 17, in a fiercely fought softball game of seven inning duration in Grant Park adjoining the World's Fair, boasts a group of real sluggers. This quartet, reading left to fight; Bill Fantozzi (violin); Joe Mourek (trumpet); Sam Dolnik (violin) and Dan Seidenberg (first cellist), fired a volley of homers, triples and doubles, to score the triumph. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra appears twice daily in concerts at Swift Bandshell at the World's Fair, while the Detroit Symphony Orchestra is playing at Ford Gardens, also at A Century of Progress."
"A happy group of visitors after their first day at the new World's Fair from York and York County Pennsylvania.
14. "A happy group of visitors after their first day at the new World's Fair from York and York County Pennsylvania. The party, under the chaperonage of Glenn E. Bailey and J.W. Barwick, numbers 153, and is composed of 75 school children and 60 teachers. They already have visited all exhibit buildings, the Field Museum, Colonial Village, the Lama Temple and Fort Dearborn. They leave Friday for home, and are staying at Judson Court, University of Chicago."
"A potato queen and the winner of a 4H Club canning contest view the Fair as their prize for their victories.
15. "A potato queen and the winner of a 4H Club canning contest view the Fair as their prize for their victories. Frances Krause, 21 years old, Lapeer Michigan, is Michigan's first Potato Queen, a title which she won at the Lapeer County Fair on September 27th from a field of 90 contestants. Merle Ruah, 14 years old, is the winner of the canning contest at the same Fair."
"Amid all the glamour and excitement of a Hollywood premiere, the first international preview of a motion
16. "Amid all the glamour and excitement of a Hollywood premiere, the first international preview of a motion picture was held in the Lagoon theater at the World's Fair. the above picture shows a part of the crowd who witnessed the first showing of 'Our Daily Bread,' King Vidor's latest picture based on the back-to-the-land movement."

"An enthusiastic crowd greeted the first appearance of the Bruce Toy Symphony Orchestra of Kansas City
17. "An enthusiastic crowd greeted the first appearance of the Bruce Toy Symphony Orchestra of Kansas City today (Tuesday) at the Court of States when it opened a three-day engagement. This unusual group of 60 children ranging from four to eight years, plays classical selections on marimbas, xylophones, orchestra bells, celestas, and a full complement of percussion instruments."
"Barbara Lou and Lawrence Jeffers, of Jacksonville, Fla., the 'Sunshine Twins' of radio fame, looked
18. "Barbara Lou and Lawrence Jeffers, of Jacksonville, Fla., the 'Sunshine Twins' of radio fame, looked in on the exhibit of their native state when they visited the Worlds Fair as the result of carrying off first honors in a buck and wing dance competition staged at Benton Harbor, Mich., recently."
"Dan Seidenberg, first cellist, whose home run blast to deep center field at Grant Park shattered a deadlocked
19. "Dan Seidenberg, first cellist, whose home run blast to deep center field at Grant Park shattered a deadlocked softball game between the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in the seventh inning today (Monday, July 23), boosted the Chicago concert masters to a sensational 18 to 17 victory today. The Chicago symphony Orchestra plays twice daily at Swift bandshell at the World's Fair while the Detroit Symphony Orchestra is filling a long engagement at Ford Gardens, also at the great exhibition. The games was to determine the softball championship between these two outstanding musical organizations."
"Here is depicted in miniature the first Edison Central Station which was constructed in New York in
20. "Here is depicted in miniature the first Edison Central Station which was constructed in New York in 1882. This is shown as a part of the exhibit of the Electric Light and Power Industry on the second floor of the Electrical Building at the World's Fair."
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