University of Illinois at Springfield Outstanding Student Masters' Theses (University of Illinois at Springfield)
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Determining an Optimal Degree of Local Involvement in the Management of a National Park /by Mark Danenhauer
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TitleDetermining an Optimal Degree of Local Involvement in the Management of a National Park /by Mark Danenhauer
SubjectNational Parks and reserves--management
DescriptionThe ‘Yellowstone model, ' a top-down approach to management, has been the prevailing approach to the management of national parks for years. Beginning in the 1970s,
this approach began to be challenged due to the failure of parks to achieve their goals and a
paradigm shift occurred that focused on involving local populations in management. This
study attempted to determine if the new paradigm actually leads to improved conservation success. The data for this study came from 54 national parks (International Union for the Conservation of Nature category II) located throughout the world; 50 of which completed surveys and the data on the remaining four national parks came from the results of the Rapid Assessment and Prioritization of Protected Area Management in Bhutan.
Based on his research, the author found no significant difference among national parks with varying degrees of local involvement in the success of conserving the natural resources within their boundaries; the park's location in a developing or developed country did not significantly affect the conservation success of the park; and there was no significant interaction between the degree of local involvement and the location of the park affecting the conservation success of the park. Additionally, this study found no significant relationship existed between the age of the park and its conservation success. However, non-significant results could be due to small sample size. In fact, the data did reveal a trend. ‘Yellowstone model' parks, with low to no local involvement, faced an average of pressures and threats 62 percent higher than co-managed parks with high local involvement. Also, parks with more local involvement exhibited a significantly higher amount of community relation efforts than parks with low to no local involvement. Further research with a larger sample size is needed in order to verify the role of local involvement in the conservation success of a national park.
99p. Nominated for the University of Illinois at Springfield's Outstanding Thesis Award, 2005
CreatorDanenhauer, Mark
Date Original2005
TypeMaster's Thesis
Text
FormatPDF, 573KB
IdentifierJ54/35/4755
SourceArchives/Special Collections, Brookens Library, University of Illinois at Springfield
Languageeng
RightsCopyright 2005, Mark Danenhauer. Used with permission.
Physical Description99p., 8.5"x11"
Date Digital2006-07
CollectionOutstanding Student Masters' Theses (University of Illinois at Springfield)
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