Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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DUNBAR SOCIETY HOLDS THROUGH TWENTY YEARS
DUNBAR SOCIETY HOLDS THROUGH TWENTY YEARS
Item IDegyptian 1945 0216dunbars.tif
TitleDUNBAR SOCIETY HOLDS THROUGH TWENTY YEARS
AuthorDaily Egyptian
DescriptionOn October 8, 1925. the largest and most important Negro organization on the campus was founded under the name of the Dunbar Literary Society for the purpose of promoting the literary, social, and athletic side of the colored students who are attending the college.
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1945 February 16
Volume27
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionDaily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
TranscriptDUNBAR SOCIETY
HOLDS THROUGH
TWENTY YEARS

On October 8, 1925. the largest and most important Negro organization on the campus was founded under the name of the Dunbar Literary Society for the purpose of promoting the literary, social, and athletic side of the colored students who are attending the college. The late President Shryock gave the club its name in honor of Paul Lawrence Dunbar. the fallotis Negro lyrist and poet lanereate of the Negroes.
With its forty-three members the Dunbar Society was very active that first year. Meeting every Wednesday after chapel for a literary or musical program, the society extended social and educational opportunities to its members. However. the club didn't limit its musical and dramatic talent to its own members. The same year the Dunbars gave performance in chapel in honor of Abraham Lincoin: they entered a float in the traditional Mardi Gras Festival. and competed in the intra-mural boys' basketball tournament.
With the motto, "God helps them that help themselves", the Dunbars were constantly struggling to do something to help themselves. Throughout the thirties they lostered the ideals of the college literary and dramatic societies; they sponsored their own homecoming dance and crowned their own Dunbar queen.
Then in 1942 the Dunbar Society sponsored an inter-racial banquet in commemoration of the birthday of the Great Emancipator. It was the first attempt of its kind at standing among the different peoples. Today with thirty-eight members the Dunbar Society under the sponsorship of Mr. David McIntosh is still alive and active. With the Independent Union and the Y.W.C.A it is co-sponsoring the Brotherhood banquet scheduled for next Wednesday evening
Perhaps Mr. Paul Dunbar has well-voiced the sentiment of this society in his "Ode to Ethiopia' when he said
"Be proud, my race, in mind and soul
Thy name is writ in Glory's scroll High mid the clouds of Fame's
bright sky
Thy banner's blazoned folds now fly;
And truth shall lift them higher.
No other race, or white or black.
LanguageEnglish
TypeText
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