Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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DARK MUSINGS
DARK MUSINGS
Item IDegyptian 1943 0514vol 24 #28.tif
TitleDARK MUSINGS
AuthorBy EARL BROOKS
DescriptionThe great patriotism of the American people
was shown in recent Red Cross and War Bond
drives. The outstanding feature of both events,
however, was the total lack of discrimination and
segregation.
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1943 May 14
Volume24
Issue28
Page(s)2
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionDaily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
TranscriptDARK MUSINGS

By EARL BROOKS

The great patriotism of the American people
was shown in recent Red Cross and War Bond
drives. The outstanding feature of both events,
however, was the total lack of discrimination and
segregation. Democracy was in action as all people made their contributions without regard for race, color, or creed. There was no racial quota or per capital rationing in this case, and that is what puzzles me.
The Anterican Red Cross raised a record $125, 000, 000. There is no doubt that the Negro aided in this drive. Just how much his contributions were, however, is not known. The reason—Negro money is not segregated by the Red Cross as the Negro blood is. The contributions were not discriminated against as the Negro volunteer Red Cross workers are. The Red Cross has a traditional pattern of racialism which causes them to have jim-crow blood banks, even when authorities say there is no difference in the blood because of race. If a man were dying, I feel certain that he would not question the source of the blood. but the quality. Surely these people who accept Negro money so willingly would not say that the quality of a dark man's blood is of a poorer grade. This would not be reason. Of an equally startling nature is the attitude of our own government. In recent weeks a $13, 000, 000, 000 war loan was floated. The Negro helped to float this record loan. He works in war industries, where prejudice and hate do not bar him; he also makes bond purchases and pays income tax. Just how much he has given this country in money and labor is unknown because his contributions are not segregated like his soldiers and sailors. His money is not taken on a quota basis as his kindred fellows are taken into the armed forces. And even the quota system is not used in all branches. The SPARS and WAVES will not accept a Negro on any basis. Yet. I feel certain that they. too. are. supported by Negro bond purchases and labor. Their very, existence is probably due to the fact that the government recognizes no race as far as contributions are concerned.
That the Negro should make these contributinos is only fair. It is his duty as a citizen to answer his country's call. I am proud of the first-class cooperation he has
given-proud because. I know that
he will, continue to cooperate in the same high spirit. I only hope that such first-class cooperation will merit first-class citizenship. If- the Negro contributions are accepted on an equal basis, then I see no reason why the man himself could not be accepted on the same basis.
America and Americans. in view of this first class spirit of cooperatiOiL should make every effort to give adequate compensation to it—not compensation in eloquent verbosity, but in actual everyday living. Every effort should be made to remove the stains of lynching and mob violence. Every act of discrimination and segregation because of race alone should be abolished. The whole United States stand in disgrace because of these things. Only their elimination cau remove this stain and disgrace. America fights to be free, but until the domestic struggle of racialism is won, It will never be free. It cannot be free as long as every tenth man is segregated or discriminated against. It can only be free when all men are accepted upon the broad plane as their contributions. When America gives as freely to all as it takes from all, it might then he truly called the "home of the free." Not until then.
LanguageEnglish
TypeText
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