Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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DARK MUSINGS
DARK MUSINGS
Item IDegyptian 1943 0115 vol 24 #14.tif
TitleDARK MUSINGS
AuthorBy EARL BROOKS
Description"Starting in 1863 Negro Americans with
their own blood and toil have bought and paid
for freedom full and unconditional ten times over
and now in 1943 Negro Americans in the army and navy by the hundreds of the thousands are fighting for the land's freedom us well as their own.
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1943 January 15
Volume24
Issue14
Page(s)2
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionDaily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
TranscriptDARK MUSINGS

By EARL BROOKS

"Starting in 1863 Negro Americans spilt their
their own blood and toil have bought and paid
for freedom full and unconditional ten times over
and now in 1943 Negro Americans in the army and navy by the hundreds of the thousands are fighting for the land's freedom as well as their own.
As I muse all alone, these lines from John Beecher's poem, "After Eighty Years, " linger in my memory.
Today, the very existence of a second front is due to the courage and firm convictions of a Negro of the Western. Hemisphere. Felix Eboue, black Frenchman and governor-general of Chad in French Equatorial Africa, refused to follow his white fellow Frenchmen in shamelessly capitulating to Nazism when France fell in June, 1940. His actions not only made a second front possible, but also made it possible for the Allies to assume the offensive for the first time. Dark men all over the world take pride in the decisive role Eboue has played in world history. They gladly pour their life-blood into that ever swelling stream to drown totalitarianism forever, hoping that their deaths will pave a new road to life and freedom.
Glowing promises were made to the Negro during the last war, only to he followed by the sickening disillusion of postwar days and the Ku Klux Klan. They had the concept that the Negro's place, because of his color was at the bottom of the heap. This was a great mistake. Never again will the Negro allow color to be the basis upon which a man is judged. Never again will he passively accept. the role of the underdog. If he is discriminated against because he is uncouth, he can become mannerly. If he is segregated because he is ignorant, he can become educated. If he is ostracized because he is unclean, he can cleanse himself. But if he is segregated and discriminated against because of his color, there is only one recourse— he must fight!
Because of his present fight for equality and his rights, the Negro has been accused of being unamerican. Maybe this is true, but if is true, it is not his fault. For over eighty years he has tried to obtain the full measure of American citizenship, and for the same length of time his hopes have been constantly shattered. He fights today that the promises of 1863 might be fulfilled. If the light of freedom is to continue to shine, those promises must be fulfilled. Justice has gone astray. Tradition and prejudice will not die. Therefore the fight for freedom and total emancipation must take place now! As Beecher said:
"I know there is a war on
but what is this war about anyway how can we believe
how can the world's people believe we mean to spread the light of freedom to the world's four corners when there is such darkness
in America's own house?

Soon it will be too late."
LanguageEnglish
TypeText
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