Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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700 Attend Black Recognition Day
700 Attend Black Recognition Day
Item IDEgyptian19680521Attend.tif
Title700 Attend Black Recognition Day
AuthorInez Rencher
Description"He's Not Gonna Treat Us Like He used to Do, " a black protest song, seemed to express the sentiments ot the audience at the Black Recognition program Sunday.
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1968 May 21
Volume49
Issue150
SectionEducation
Page(s)2
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionDaily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
Transcript700 Attend Black Recognition Day

By Inez Rencher

"He's Not Gonna Treat Us Like He used to Do, " a black protest song, seemed to express the sentiments ot the audience at the Black Recognition program Sunday.
The nearly 700 Black spectators at the program in the SIU Arena clapped and responded vocally to the spiritual-like song by the Spencer Family, a part of the Phil Cochran Ensemble from Chicago.
Darryl Madison, a member of WE, the sponsoring organization, was master of ceremonies for the five-hour festivites. Music, readings, dance and speeches were interspersed throughout the program and a four-part suite by the Cochran group culminated it.
Inturpretive dancing, song and instrumental music were used in the suite to commemorate Malcolm X, whose birthdate the program honored. The ensemble dramatlized and vocalized what was considered
the four stages of his life.
Original poetry appropriate to the black rebellion was offered by Alicia Johnson and Tena Lockett. Among the
American African Student Union and James King, former SIU student. Brown called for greater unity among local blacks as well as among those all over the world.
In addition to original and traditional black spirituals sung by the Spencer Family, Patricia Smith, SIU student, expressed in song the blues heritage of the blacks with selections popularized by such artists as Aretha Franklin and the late Dinah Washington.
The local Black Mystics combo presented combination of music and readings. A majority of the spectators
wore African attire to the program.
The donations of 35 cents per person will be contributed to aid the northeast, predominantily black community of Carbondale, according to Madison.

LanguageEnglish
TypeText
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