Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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African Student Called Home, Gets Degree Six Months Early
African Student Called Home, Gets Degree Six Months Early
Item IDEgyptian19660104African.tif
TitleAfrican Student Called Home, Gets Degree Six Months Early
AuthorEgyptian
DescriptionAn African graduatestudent at SIU received his degree six months early because his country needed him back on the farm.
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1966 January 4
Volume47
Issue60
SectionEducation
Page(s)6
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionDaily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
TranscriptAfrican Student Called Home, Gets Degree Six Months Early

An African graduatestudent at SIU received his degree six months early because his country needed him back on the farm.
Wadson B. Deleza, 29-year-old agronomy major, donned cap and gown to be received formally in the office of President Delyte W. Morris shortly before Christmas. Wearing his own academic robes, Morris congratulated him and bade him fatewell, Malawi, the year-old republic which is Deleza's home, needs agricultural experts.
Although he completed requirements at SIU in December for his master's digree in agronomy, Deleza hadplanned to stay in the U.S. and continue study for a doctorate. He would have received his master's along with'- other members of SIU's class of'66 next June.
However, because British crop technicians have been leaving the former crown protectorate (Nyasaland) since it won independence and changed its name in 1964, the government asked Deleza to come home early.
Deleza was the first-student to come to SIU under the African-American Felflowship
plan sponsored by the African American Institute.
Deleza, who received a bachelor's degree at Ethiopia's Haile Selassie University, came to SIU because the crop-growing conditions and agricultural environment in this area are much like those in Malawi,
He concentrated on plant industries and did his master's research on corn, major human food crop in Malawi. He says one of his country's pressing agricultural needs is
to boost corn yields with more variety and introduction of hybrids.
"I've learned a great deal that can certainly benefit my country's agriculture, " Deleza told Morris. "I hope I can return to America for my doctorate."
Alfred B. Caster, chairman of the Department of Plant Industries, said Deleza should have no difficulty qualifying. "He was an excellent student and we'd love to have more like him."
LanguageEnglish
TypeText
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