Southern Illinois University Carbondale Daily Egyptian Diversity News Archive (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
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Jamal Concert Adds Glitter To Big Week
Jamal Concert Adds Glitter To Big Week
Item IDEgyptian19600422jamal.tif
TitleJamal Concert Adds Glitter To Big Week
AuthorDaily Egyptian
DescriptionAhmad Jamal—complete with cart-quick fingers, goatee, pulsating piano and jazz trio—will swing
into Shryock Auditorium
Original Publication SourceDaily Egyptian
Date1960 April 22
Volume41
Issue50
Page(s)1
Digital File Format.TIF (Tagged Image Format)
Digital File PublisherSpecial Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Rights StatementAll copyrights held by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. For permission to reproduce, distribute, or otherwise use this image, please contact the Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Phone: + 1 (618) 453-2516. Email: http://reftrack.lib.siu.edu/reft100.aspx?key=SCRCEmail&cllcid=SCRR
CollectionUniversity Archives: Daily Egyptian Diversity Articles Index
TranscriptJamal Concert Adds Glitter To Big Week

Ahmad Jamal—complete with cart-quick fingers, goatee, pulsating piano and jazz trio—will swing
into Shryock Auditorium April 30 for two concerts, sponsored by Inter-Greek Council.
Hundreds of tickets for both thows are still available at the Student Union ticket office. The
shows each last an hour and a half, but Jamal, who believes in quantity as well as quality, has
been known to plan on and on for appreciative audiences. All seats are reserved at $2, $1.75 and $1.50. Times are 7 and 9 p.m.
Probably the most successful jazz pianist going today, Jamal combines expert musicians hip
with an astute awareness of popular tastes. Such albums as "But Not For Me" and "Ahmad Jamal"
have multipled his fan following from a handful of Chicagoans tomoved an audience numbering into the millions, both in the United States and Europe.
Born in Pittsburg July 2, 1930, Jamal began playing piano at the age of three. He studied with Mary, Caldwell Dawson, noted concert
singer and teacher and later with Jam Miller, one of the country's foremost pianist-teachers. Coming Great
At 14, the late great Art Tatum singled Jamal out as a "coming great." He gained much experience during his early years by playing with everything from big bands to small groups and as a soloist.
From Westinghouse High School where he gave many concerts and determined to make music his
career, Ahmad stepped in'imediately into the George Hudson Orchestra, one of the top big bands of that era.
Singled out repeatedly by critics for his highly individual solos, he moved next to a small groin called The Four Strings. When they disbanded in 1950, he toured briefly as accompanist for a song and dance team known as The Caldwells. Ahmad burst into national prominence when Down Beat's Pat Harris heralded him a "new find" when he worked at the Blue Note in 1950.
First Trio
Throughout these early years in the music business, Ahmad acquired the experience and business acumen that enabled him to
establish his own trio early in 1951, consisting of piano. bass and guitar.
Within a year the group was attrading nationwide attention and a string of important club dates
chiefly in Chicago, New York and other eastern cities.
In 1958 the release of two LP's skyrocketed Jamal high in thet popular record market. The most
successful pianist to bridge the gap between jazz and the popular field, his jazz releases were listed on juke boxes across the nation
alongside the biggest of "pops."
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